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In the midst of 38 4000

Zermatt was discovered in the middle of the 19th century, in the golden age of high alpinism. Almost one-third of all the 4,000 metre peaks in the Alps are grouped around the village, which has been visited by mountaineers from all around the world since the first ascent of the Matterhorn in the year 1865. A myth was born at that time: the names of Zermatt and the Matterhorn became known all around the world, and Zermatt was regarded as the Mecca of the mountaineers.

And it has remained so up to the present day: more than 3,000 alpinists climb the Matterhorn every year, which is several time more than all the other 37 summits combined. But every summit around Zermatt has its individual character, its history, its myths. Learn about all our beautiful mountains on this page!


The Obergabelhorn is one of the mighty chain of 4,000-metre mountains between the Nikolai valley and the Val d'Anniviers: from the South-west to the North-east, these are the Dent Blanche, Obergabelhorn, Zinalrothorn and Weisshorn. The North and the South Faces are markedly different, the North Face being completely covered by snow and ice and having a regular pyramid shape, while the South Face, which faces the Nikolai Valley, is rocky, and has the shape of a fork.
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The Parrotspitze is one of the nine independent, 4,000-metre summits of the Monte Rosa Massif, with a prominence of 136 m. The prominence of a mountain is an important characteristic for the determination of its autonomy (compare the prominence of the Balmenhorn and the Schwarzhorn). From the west and the east, the Parrotspitze has the shape of a pyramid, and of a hump from the north. It is covered with firn (corn snow) – this is old snow (last-year’s snow) that occurs when snow crystals melt together into large, hailstone-like pieces as a result of melting and re-freezing. The appearance is very different from the south: here, the mountain presents a sheer face.
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Pollux (Italian: Punta Polluce) is one of the two peaks known as the “Twins”. With a height of 4,092 metres above sea level, it is lower than its “twin brother” Castor. Both mountains lie between the Breithorn Massif and the Liskamm, with Pollux lying to the north-west of Castor. They are separated by the Zwillingsjoch (English: Twin col: Italian: Passo di Verra, 3,845 m a.s.l.).
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The Rimpfischhorn is a peak of the Mischabel group, and lies to the east of Zermatt. It is a demanding mountain for mountaineers, with a jagged top surrounded by magnificent glaciers. The Rimpfischhorn is regarded as a training mountain for the Matterhorn: anyone who proves himself/herself here is ready to climb the Matterhorn.
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The Schwarzhorn, or Corno Nero, located to the south of the Ludwigsspitze, was the last peak of the Monte Rosa massif to be conquered. It belongs to the extended list of 4000-metre peaks, as does the Balmenhorn. Its free-standing height is only a mere 50 metres, even if the mountain top is black and strikingly prominent. No fewer than 12 summits in the Alps bear the name Schwarzhorn and the Schwarzhorn in the Monte Rosa massif is in fact the highest but by no means the best known. It can be reached on skis in winter and spring.
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Climbers tackling the Monte Rosa massif today do it primarily with a high-Alpine tour on the Signalkuppe and to the Capanna Regina Margerita Hut, the highest-altitude building in Europe. The Signalkuppe is Switzerland’s fourth-highest peak and forms a very prominent corner in topographical terms as the long, 4000-metre-high mountain chain here branches to the north over the Nordend and Strahlhorn to the Mischabel group. From the south and south-east, the Signalkuppe appears the principal rise as it falls away in walls and sheer glaciers. The mountain is on the Swiss-Italian border, which was relocated in 1941 in favour of Italy.
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The Stecknadelhorn is the most unspectacular of the four 4000-metre summits of the Nadelgrat ridges. In order of location, these are the Nadelhorn, Stecknadelhorn, Hobärghorn and Dirruhorn. The Stecknadelhorn is connected to the Nadelhorn on the north-west and, like the Hobärghorn, has a glacier on the north side.
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The Strahlhorn lies in the vicinity of Saas Fee, half-way between the Mischabel group and the Monte Rosa, a few kilometres from the Italian border. Its summit is 4,190 metres above sea level.
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The Täschhorn belongs to the Mischabel group, and is one of the most difficult four-thousand metre summits to climb in Valais. Due to the demanding normal route (Mischabel Ridge), this summit is relatively rarely climbed. The Täschhorn is a three-sided pyramid. The East Face protrudes above Saas Fee, the West Face is above Täsch and the South Face above the Täschalp (Ottavan).
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The Vincent Pyramid is the most southern of the nine 4,000-metre summits of the Monte Rosa Massif, and is located in Italy. Its first ascent was not so much inspired by sporting ambition but rather the search for high-mountain gold. The search for gold: this explains the illustrious rope group consisting of Johann Nikolaus Vincent, the owner of the gold mines of Alagna, who was a mining engineer and the first person to reach the summit, the hunter Jacques Castel and two mine workers.
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